Wednesday, September 20, 2017

Tennesee Ernie Ford, sings Amazing Grace

If you know me at all you know you are unlikely to find me in a church on a Sunday morning.   But Amazing Grace became a favorite probably the first time I heard it.

Many years ago in a place called childhood, when radios were big and clunky and didn't run on batteries, also they were much more common that TV, there was a program on everyday at noon called the Tennessee Ernie Ford Show. 


It was probably sponsored by Ford Motor company, or anyway that is what made sense to my little kiddo brain.  He had guests and told stories, well that was a long time ago and I have forgotten alot. But never that  incredible voice.  When he sang  "16 Tons of number 9 coal..." it gave me chills. 
Living  much of my young life just down the road from a coal mine, and even closer to a coal tipple, and being an inquisitive, pesty child I am sure I asked my uncles if they shoveled that much coal when came home in the evening coated with black dust, also remember how I wondered why their glasses were clean if the rest of them was so dirty.



My grandmother was a church musician and I think we listened so she could hear the Spirituals, though. Thanks to the wonders of YOUTUBE I can now share the  song that hat has stayed with me ever since.




Tuesday, September 19, 2017

wooden xylophone in the woods

Smitten by the image and sound of a xylophone in the forest, I  keep watching this video and try to image  it in along my favorite woodland path.   Truly I am at a loss for words.








Xylophone of forest

  • An art made of material fir and maple grown in Hokkaido. Roll a ball from the top of the xylophone and enjoy the tone.
  • You can find a vending machine placed at the top the xylophone and purchase a ball cost you 300 JPY for one. Play with the ball as many times you want and bring it back home as a souvenir. Don't forget the ball next time you come back to play with xylophone.
  • The keyboard is simply placed and set on the pedestal to make the sound better. In case the keyboard comes off or fall down, please return it to the original position in consideration for the next users.
  • This service takes a rest for xylophone protection on a rainy day




Jesu, Joy of Man's Desiring


Jesus, joy of man's desiring
Holy wisdom, love most bright
Drawn by Thee, our souls aspiring
Soar to uncreated light

Word of God, our flesh that fashioned
With the fire of life impassioned
Striving still to truth unknown
Soaring, dying round

Thy throne Jesus, joy of man's desiring
Holy wisdom, love most bright
Drawn by Thee, our souls aspiring
Soar to uncreated light

Word of God, our flesh that fashioned
With the fire of life impassioned
Striving still to truth unknown
Soaring, dying round Thy throne

JS Bach

Sorta silent Snday looking at country


There is a phrase in a Loretta Lynn song something like "when your looking at me your looking at country" and in an interview she explained that it meant just driving around looking at things.  


















haiku ~~~ dream house



curtains and sunrise
have I  dreamed  this simple room
and I dream again

Tuesday, September 12, 2017

Saturday, September 9, 2017

listening to a wood thrush

this post was scheduled to appear last Wednesday, but it didn't, so it's here now



Somewhere in the cosmos I reckon that there is some one who flips a switch each year on Labor Day, and the sounds of summer disappear.  The birds stop singing, the traffic on country roads slows, even the dogs don't bark as much.  



 Early Labor Day morning I walked  through the woods, along an old logging road, a gentle summery breeze rustled the leaves,  the distant sounds of traffic were near absent.   The only sounds were my own footsteps.   And I paused, not to dwell on the sadness and stress of the year past, but to feel grateful, to finally be here.   To be  returning to my childhood home.

The stillness was broken by one solitary bird, a wood thrush, it's complex song has always been my favorite.   I recall that someone, and Aunt or cousin, neighbor may-be, it really doesn't matter told me that it was a woodsprite whistling to let me know I was welcome here. Truly I did feel welcome.

A big part of any holiday or celebration was sitting on the huge front porch of my Grandparent's home, with cousins, Aunts and Uncles and occasional neighbors, of which there were few, after supper.   We would watch the cars go past, and listen to the corn stalks rustling their way dry, so they could be cut down and used for fodder during the coming months.   Off in the distance there were whippoorwills, we entertained ourselves but repeating their   distinctive call back to them.    Gradually the darkness  surrounded us, and the few passing cars had their lights on.  A chill , but sweet breeze  rose from the fields, as the grown-ups talked about grown-up stuff.
Some evenings the breeze came from the direction of the cow barn, but we were used to that pungent aroma.   Gradually everyone made their way home.  I was always the last to go into the house, say my Goodnights, then to drift off into dreams.  

Many years. actually over 6 decades later, I found myself again on that huge front porch.  But this time alone, watching the cars and waiting to hear whippoorwills, but none called, and none returned my calls.  I wasn't expecting it to be the same, I am not the same, but I was finally home.




Tennesee Ernie Ford, sings Amazing Grace

If you know me at all you know you are unlikely to find me in a church on a Sunday morning.   But Amazing Grace became a favorite probably t...